The Peacemaker Arrives
in his white stone canoe

ART Marcine Quenzer

The Peacemaker
text and art

by Marcine Quenzer

The people of Turtle Island grew and multiplied until they numbered a great many nations. These nations began to feud and fight among each other. The wars became so bad that the peopleís hearts were constantly on the ground. They were always burying a child, a father, a brother, an uncle, or some loved one. The people were fearful of leaving their homes at night.

The Creator did not intend for man to kill one another, so the Creator sent a special emissary to the people. †The Peacemaker came into this world to teach the path of peace to all who would hear it.

This unique messenger was to be born of a Huron Virgin in a Wendot settlement of Takahaanaye on the north shore of Lake Ontario. †Having no father placed great hardships on his mother. The grandmother was most harsh with her daughter, demanding to know of the babyís father. Many times, his mother shed tears because of the harshness of the grandmother.

Then one night, The Creator gave the old woman a dream.† The Creator told her the baby should be named "Deganiwida," which was to mean Master of All Things.† The child had an important work to do for humankind. †He was sent by the Creator on an extraordinary assignment: to stop the war and killing, to bring peace to the people, but that he would be the destroyer of his own people.† Because of this prophecy, the grandmother decided that the baby must be drowned. She took the baby to the water and cut a hole in the ice. She then threw the baby in the water, thinking she was done with this. But in the morning, the child was wrapped warmly sleeping in the motherís bed.

The Grandmother thought this showed the child had some magical orenda, but she decided to throw him in the icy waters again. †And the next morning there the child was warmly snuggled against the mother.† Now the grandmother thought that this child was indeed exceptional. After that, the grandmother was good to the daughter, and loved her grandson very much.

The child grew quickly, growing large for his age, and he exhibited unusual abilities. While other Wendat boys played at war to sharpen the skills they would need later in life, he talked to the spiritual forces about him. And he talked of peace, friendship and unity. This handsome young man was always completely honest, and always spoke with a straight tongue. However, he departed from the ways a young man should go, as he simply did not understand the quarreling and contention displayed over misunderstandings and disagreements. He tried to show the people a better way to settle their differences. He left behind 12 young men that he had taught his way of Peace and the Good Mind.
Healing Adodarho
combing snakes from his hair

ART Marcine Quenzer

So, when he had become a man, he said one day to his mother and grandmother, "I shall now build my canoe, for the time has come for me to set out on my mission in the world.† Know that far away, on lakes and many rivers, I go seeking the council smoke of nations beyond this lake, holding my course to the sunrise. †It is my business to stop the shedding of blood among human beings."

When he had carved his canoe and, with the help of his mother and grandmother, had brought it to the water, he bade them farewell.† It was hard for them to see him leave his homeland and travel to an unknown country and people who were fierce.

"Do not look for my return," he said, "for I shall not come again this way.† Should you wish to know if all is well with me, go to the hilltop yonder where stands a single tree.† Cut at the tree with your hatchets, and, if blood flows from the wound, you will know that I have perished and my work has failed.† But if no blood flows, all is well, my mission is successful."

"But the canoe is made of stone," said his grandmother.† "It will not float."

"It will float," he replied.† "This shall be a sign that my words are true."† He entered the canoe, and it swiftly moved out into Lake Ontario, and left his homeland.† In time, his name became sacred among the people, and he would be referred to only as "The Peacemaker."

Sunday, October 11, 2009 www.OnondagaVesica.info

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